Read A Good Cook Book?

There are simple things in this world which gives a person happiness even though they don’t know why. One of this is the love for cook books. Actually, you can list down many things why cook books remain as the top bought items in book stores and book sales.

They inspire you to be something better. Not only as a better but as a better mom or dad when it comes to preparing foods. Food preparation is an art and no matter how simple that dish is, there’s some kind of love and passion which a cook should have in order to satisfy the eater.

They make your heart flutter. As you see look into those pages full of colorful meals and delightful sweets, it’s very easy to fall in love and yearn to go to that bakeshop and buy your slice of cake or your dish of steak.

They look good in book shelves. No matter how many years you stuck them in your library, time will come when they will become handy.

They can last forever. The recipes and the ideas in cook books will last forever. Ingredients and cooking tools may become more modern as years pass by but basic cooking tips will always be the basis in cooking.

They can be the best gifts. Want to please your girlfriend, mom, or your soon to be mom-in-law? These books will give you the best shot.

They are unbiased. No publication can be as universal as cook books. No matter if you are black or white, Asian or Chinese, you won’t feel guilty reading this publication. What’s better is that you learn to appreciate people with the way they prepare their food.

Young and old will appreciate cooking books. There are books even for kids as young as 5. Babies will appreciate the amazing colors offered by these materials and elders can remember their good old kitchen while sitting and browsing on her self-made cook book.

There are just a hundred more reasons to love a good cook book but the most important thing about these materials is that they bring out something better from the readers. You can’t just open a page without getting something out of them.

Cook books are made by angels, whether they are angels from earth or from the heavens above. They make a cook’s life a breeze and they make a much better world for all food lovers.

The Science of Good Cooking: Cook’s Illustrated

Cooks Illustrated: The Science of Good Cooking is a goldmine. Reading the title may make the buyer beware. Is this a cookbook or a science lecture? Cooks, relax! In addition to explaining why a recipe works, the book is chock full of delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes. As a former subscriber to Cook’s Magazine and avid cook, I have made and can attest to the quality of many recipes in this book. The cover of this new cookbook says it all. Four hundred recipes are “Engineered for Perfection.” In addition to the tested and delicious recipes, the book is an education on what kinds of ingredients and cooking techniques will make your dish come out perfectly.

Fifty concepts are explored. Some intriguing examples are:

· Green Vegetables Like It Hot-Then Cold

· Slicing Changes Garlic and Onion Flavor

· Vodka Makes Pie Dough Easy

· Don’t Soak Beans-Brine ‘Em

· Resting Meat Maximizes Juices

Recipes for appetizers, dressings soups, stews, poultry, pasta dishes, rice, vegetables, meat, fish, eggs, breads, desserts are clearly laid out. Flexible ingredient substitutes may save you a trip to the store. A “Why this recipe works section” explains the nitty-gritty of the technique. Pictures show test kitchen results to demonstrate the effects of certain changes to the recipes. (For example, how you handle your butter affects what your biscuits look and taste like).

I tested one recipe on my husband, who hates to cook. He made the “Meatballs for 12” recipe. The meatballs were tender, delicious and easy. He said the directions were clearly presented, flexible as to ingredient substitution, and doable. He is a math guy so he really enjoyed the scientific explanations about why 93% beef didn’t work as well as 85% beef. (Juicier meatballs). Once you master the meatball recipe, a Swedish Meatball recipe with similar technique is presented for expanding your serving possibilities.

A chapter on cakes starts with the standard “Fluffy Yellow Layer Cake.” Then you can go wild with recipes for Chiffon cake, Lemon Bundt Cake, Best Shortbread, Cheese Cake and many frostings.

Good Cooking Tips

Have you ever made a recipe and it came out disastrous? Did you ever consider why?

Well here are some tips that are imperative to good cooking.

· TASTE AS YOU GO!

For most cooks, tasting is automatic, but when it’s not, the price can be high.

There are so many factors that can destroy a recipe… your ingredients, the amounts, your stove, and a million other factors. Due to these factors, the results can vary greatly. As you add ingredients, taste to see if the recipe is going in the right direction.

· SUBSTITUTES

You make substitutions in baking that turn the recipe into something else.

Unless it has been proven to work, don’t experiment with something you will be serving for desert that night. If you don’t have an ingredient, wait until you can purchase it before attempting to make it. Which brings me to the next tip…

· READ, READ, READ.

You start making the recipe and find out you don’t have one of the ingredients.

Read the entire recipe the day before you start cooking. If you need to purchase something, or perform a task, you will have time to do it.

You don’t want to be an hour away from dinner guests arriving when you get to the part of the recipe that says to marinate the meat overnight or find you are missing an ingredient.

· KNOWING COOKING DEFINITIONS

Simmering vs. boiling.

Simmering is cooking over low heat where the bubbles are slowly breaking at the surface.

Boiling is cooking over med to high heat where the bubbles are breaking fast and often at the surface.

Ok so the recipe calls for simmering the meat for 2 to 3 hours, and you boiled the meat for 30 to 45 minutes…the meat comes out tough and hard to chew.

Because it was cooked too fast it lost the juices and became “shoe leather”.

If you are not prepared to put in the time needed to prepare a dish then save it for when you do.